Analytics v/s Content in Marketing

Stephen Covey in his highly acclaimed book wrote the following,

“But shortly after World War I the basic view of success shifted from the character ethic to what we might call the personality ethic. Success became more a function of personality, of public image, of attitudes and behaviours, skills and techniques, which lubricate the processes of human interaction.”

To a great extent, marketing is also fighting a similar character v/s personality syndrome; of course, in its own flavour. For example, the founder of Stayzilla stated the following during the time of its closure, “During the last three to four years, though, I can honestly state that somewhere I lost my path. I started treasuring GMV, room-nights and other ‘vanity’ metrics instead of the fundamentals of cash flow and working capital.”

He further adds, “In one of my digital marketing campaigns, I got the chance to work with a renowned CMO directly. In one conversation, he stated that nowadays there’s a lot of fuss around analytics. It seems that analytics tend to drive everything but in reality, it’s the other way round. Analytics provide you with the insights of your campaigns and give you more intuitive understanding of SWOT elements of your marketing campaigns. But if you are first deciding the metrics and then, deciding the rest, you are playing a very risky business.”

In recent job description of marketing, you will easily find responsibilities parts as:

  • Drive online traffic
  • Track conversion rates
  • Utilise range of techniques like paid search, SEO and PPC
  • Social media strategy

In only one JD of digital marketing, have I found the following words:

  • Content development
  • Email marketing
  • Excellent writing abilities
  • Creative/consultative slide ware/content creation
  • Creativity, passion to innovate

The point I am trying to make is that marketing is a creative work. When a prospect visits your website, he/she will only become hooked when he/she comes across remarkable things, which in turn is driven by content. If your content has high engagement potential, metrics such as bounce rate, time spent on a webpage will definitely be rewarded. Take, for example, YouTube viral videos. Kevin Alloca in his TED talk mentioned that a viral video comprises humorous and surprising elements with a point to get across to its audience. Can we see any analytics-based approach? It’s pure human emotions that are defining such viral videos’ success, not Google analytics or super computer algorithm. Yes, such insights will help you in deciding what to publish on YouTube to make it more productive. But again, it will be content that will decide the success of the upcoming video.

In conclusion, I would like to end with the following quote by Seth Godin,

“Content marketing is the only marketing left “.

 

Author: Rupam Lathwal

PGPM Class of 2017, Great Lakes, Gurgaon

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